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Christmas in Japan

22 Dec

If and where I am wrong about these things, Van Tilden will have to correct me.

Christmas in Japan happens a little differently than it does in the USA.

Typically, children may only get a small present and not several as they do in the USA and other countries.

The big issues of Christmas is the Japanese Christmas Cake, which is traditionally eaten on December 25th.

Japanese Christmas cakes are almost invariably sponge cakes with whipped icing and strawberries on them.

The cakes are often highly decorative and aesthetic.

Personally, I’m not a fan of sponge cake or whipped icing, so I’m not sure I would be happy with a Japanese Christmas Cake.

Christmas is not so much about family time as it is about romantic time. Christmas Eve and Christmas Day are a time for couples to be together on dates.

Another aspect that took me by surprise is that in Japan, fried chicken is quite popular for Christmas! KFC even has Colonel Sanders dressed up to look like Santa Claus.

Advertisement for Japanese KFC Meal!

Also, I just found out that Beethoven’s 9th Symphony is considered to be the most popular Christmas music in Japan. You can listen to it on Youtube by clicking anywhere here.

Finally, Colonel Sanders as Santa Claus!

Thanks everyone for reading my blog, and I hope you enjoyed learning about Christmas celebrated in other cultures.

Beaux


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2 Comments

Posted by on December 22, 2010 in food

 

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2 responses to “Christmas in Japan

  1. norma sasser

    December 25, 2010 at 7:14 am

    i can truthfully vouch for how great those cakes are, cause my wonderful friend Yoshiko bought me one for my 60th birthday, chocolate tag said Happy Birthday, and it was unforgettable, also, i got to pose with the colonel, such fantastic memories, how i love Japan

     
    • enamouredslave

      December 25, 2010 at 2:52 pm

      Ms. Norma, I’m glad you enjoy those cakes. I’ve always thought that they were really, really pretty.

       

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